The news section of the German Society for Philosophy of Science (GWP)

Submitted by Vera Hoffmann-Kolss (University of Bern).

 

Call for Applications

Summer school on “Causation and Responsibility” with Sara Bernstein and Alex Kaiserman

July 26-30, 2021
University of Bern

Organizers:
Vera Hoffmann-Kolss (University of Bern)
Matthias Rolffs (University of Bern)

Causation and responsibility seem to be closely related. Prima facie, agents can be held responsible only for outcomes they caused. What is more, the degree to which agents can be held responsible for the outcomes of their actions seems to depend on how much they causally contributed to them. For instance, if two companies, A and B, jointly cause some environmental damage, their causal contributions may differ: it is possible that company A dumps more toxic waste or emits more greenhouse gases than company B. But then, it seems plausible to conclude that company A is more responsible for the damage resulting from these actions than company B.

It is vividly debated, however, how exactly this relationship is to be understood. Is causation really a necessary condition for responsibility? Is responsibility generally proportional to causal contribution? And what are the implications of this relationship for metaphysical theories of causation? The aim of this event is to discuss these issues with international experts in the field.

The event consists of three parts:

The first two days (July 26-27) will be devoted to a discussion of background texts introducing the topic.

The next 1.5 days (July 28-29) will feature sessions taught by two leading experts in the field: Sara Bernstein (Notre Dame) and Alex Kaiserman (Oxford). There will also be room for student presentations.

The final event (on July 29-30) will be a 1.5 day workshop with further invited speakers.

We invite applications by BA-, MA-, and doctoral students in philosophy and related subjects.

Please provide us with the following application material:
* A letter of motivation (max. 1 page), indicating why you are interested in attending the summer school and how you expect to benefit from it
* A short CV (max. two pages)

Please send your application as a single pdf to matthias.rolffs@philo.unibe.ch by April 16, 2021.

If you get accepted, you will be invited to participate in an online introductory session on May 21, 2021, 10am – 12pm.

We also plan to provide a limited number of travel bursaries.

For further information, see: www.philosophie.unibe.ch/car2021.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Matthias Rolffs (matthias.rolffs@philo.unibe.ch).

We currently plan to host an in-person event at the University of Bern. However, we are prepared to switch to an online solution, depending on the further development of the COVID-19 pandemic. Updates will follow.

Submitted by Hajo Greif (Warsaw University of Technology).

 

Lecture series “Thinking Machines: History, Present and Future of Artificial Intelligence”

Call for participation

The international and interdisciplinary online lecture series “Thinking Machines: History, Present and Future of Artificial Intelligence” in Summer Term 2021 will feature prominent historians, philosophers and social students of AI. Speakers include: Pamela McCorduck, Stephanie Dick, Shannon Vallor, Harry Collins, Wolfgang Bibel, Vincent Müller, Virginia Dignum, and Kristian Kersting.

Talks will be held in bi-weekly fashion on Mondays at 16:30 CEST (UTC +2), starting on 19 April, 2021. Participation is free of charge, but please register online in order to be provided with access data (platform: zoom). Registration facilities, full programme and abstracts are available at: https://thinking-machines.online/

The series is jointly hosted by the Research Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Deutsches Museum; the European New School of Digital Studies, European University Viadrina; and the Philosophy of Computing group, Warsaw University of Technology. It is realised with financial support by Bayerische Forschungsallianz.

We are looking forward to welcoming you to our series!

Hajo Greif, Jan-Hendrik Passoth and Rudolf Seising

Submitted by Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin)

 

Call for Abstracts

2nd European Society for the History of Science Early Career Scholars Conference

20-22 September 2021 in Athens, Greece

We invite submissions for individual papers addressing the main topic of the conference:

Science and its Enemies: Exploring Conflicts and Alliances in the History of Science.

The terminology of “enemy” connotes “opponent”, “antagonist”, “adversary”, “rival”, or “competitor”, and thereby opens perspectives in various directions. This topic thus comprises a wide range of potential ‘enemies’ of science, including material, natural, supernatural, and ideological ones, and perhaps even science itself.

Note that the main topic is meant as a guideline and does not serve as an exclusionary factor for the selection of papers. Any topic on the History of Science is welcome. Submissions by individuals from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to submit an abstract.

For more details, please visit our website:

https://eshsathens2021.wordpress.com/

The Early Career Scholars Network of the European Society for the History of Science (ESHS) was founded to better integrate graduate students and early career researchers in the activities of the Society and in the field of History of Science. The first Early Career Scholars Conference was held in 2019 in Paris, and it continues to be organized biennially in different cities around the world. The second conference in the series is planned to be held on 20-22 September 2021 in Athens, Greece. Depending on the development of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, however, this plan might be subject to change.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Theodore Arabatzis (Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Athens, ESHS President)
Kostas Gavroglu (Emeritus Professor of History of Science, University of Athens)

Host institutions:
The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
The National Hellenic Research Foundation

Conference Organizing Committee: Beatriz Martínez-Rius (Sorbonne Université Paris), Jelena Stanulovic (University of Belgrade), Grigoris Panoutsopoulos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens), Cosmin Koszor-Codrea (Brooks University, Oxford), and Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt University Berlin)

Submissions: PhD candidates and Early Career Scholars (up to eight years after they obtained their PhD) in History of Science or related disciplines are invited to submit a proposal.

Individual proposals must include an abstract up to 300 words, for a 20-minute presentation, and name and affiliation of the candidate. Please submit all proposals via e-mail: eshs.athens.2021@gmail.com

NEW DEADLINE for submissions: March 31st, 2021

Notification of acceptance: by the end of April, 2021

Travel bursaries: The ESHS offers a limited number of small travel funds for speakers who need financial aid. Applicants are asked to send, besides their abstract, a motivation letter (maximum one page) and a short CV.

For more information, you may contact us via Facebook, Twitter (@EshsC), or e-mail [eshs.athens.2021@gmail.com].

Submitted by Maria Kronfeldner (CEU).

 

This is to kindly invite you to the Official CEU Online Book Launch of The Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization on Mar 23, 5:30-7:00 pm (CET, Vienna time).

The Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization is the outcome of a unique collaboration of more than 30 authors from various disciplines, including history, philosophy, social psychology, literary studies and more, to create the first comprehensive and multidisciplinary reference source of the key concepts, issues, and debates within dehumanization studies.

The contributors and Routledge’s editor will join. The event begins with a screening of a video related to the chapter’s contents and continues with an interactive Q&A discussion.

The printed official version from Routledge is on offer (20% off, with coupon code on event website): https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Handbook-of-Dehumanization/Kronfeldner/p/book/9781138588158

An open access post-print version will soon be available for free on PhilPapers, where you can already find some pre-print chapters: https://philpapers.org/rec/KRORHO

To join the event, see Zoom link on the event website: https://events.ceu.edu/2021-03-23/book-launch-routledge-handbook-dehumanization

Submitted by Sebastian Schuol (FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg).

 

New Conference Date: July 22-23, 2021

Center for Applied Philosophy of Science and Key Qualifications (ZiWiS), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

Due to the postponement of the Conference “Public Research and Private Knowledge – Science in Times of Diverse Research Funding” we are able to accept a number of further contributions. We invite everyone interested in presenting their research at the conference to submit a suitable anonymized abstract of up to 500 words until April 18, 2021 to ziwis-conference@fau.de. Please find detailed information below.

Topic:
The production and distribution of knowledge is a key process in scientific and scholarly inquiry. However, this process is not and has never been limited to universities and public research institutes alone, but extends to agents as diverse as the Research & Development Departments of companies, citizen scientists, and private non-profit research institutes. In recent years, these agents have shown an increased interest in basic ˗ as opposed to applied ˗ science, for example in fields of rising social significance such as AI or biomedical technology. These specific research interests in turn direct attention to the sources of funding, and, as a consequence, to the direction of inquiry and the accessibility of results. The main problem that arises from this development can be expressed in two questions: First, does the influence of private funding change the selection of research topics in an epistemically or otherwise (un-) desirable direction? And second, does it lead to a privatization of knowledge, and if so, what are the consequences of this privatization? Some key questions in this area of investigation are:

  • Where do new sources of research funding come from, and how important a role do they play? Which agents foster the development, which methods do they use, and what are their primary motivations?
  • What are the epistemic consequences, and who is affected by them? What is the impact of business interests on epistemic norms and ideals, and are there any (additional) sources of bias to be expected?
  • Have there been any (changes of) institutional structures in the last decades that have stimulated or hindered these tendencies? Which historical idea of science is at stake? Which factors affected the practices of organizing the production and distribution of scientific knowledge during the second half of the 20th century?
  • Is academic freedom threatened by these developments, and if so, to what extent? How could it be maintained? What are the epistemic effects of endowment chairs and industry-sponsored PhD projects?
  • Does public financial support for private (pharmaceutical) companies to accelerate research and development (such as e.g. currently witnessed with respect to SARS-CoV2 vaccines) have relevant epistemological or ethical implications?

This set of questions requires an epistemological assessment as well as a historical, sociological, and economic perspective. Therefore, the interdisciplinary conference of the Center for Applied Philosophy of Science and Key Qualifications at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany) aims at bringing together researchers from all pertinent fields in order to further our understanding of this apparent organizational shift in knowledge production and distribution and to accurately evaluate the challenges and opportunities it presents.

Keynote speakers:

  • Manuela Fernández Pinto (Universidad de los Andes)
  • Bennett Holman (Yonsei University)
  • Naomi Oreskes (Harvard University)
  • Sergio Sismondo (Queen’s University, Kingston)

Call for Papers:
There are several slots for presentations (up to 20 minutes for the talk, followed by 10 minutes for discussion). Please send an anonymized abstract (approx. 500 words) and a separate document specifying your general information (name, contact, affiliation) by April 18, 2021 to ziwis-conference@fau.de. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by May 1, 2021. We welcome proposals from individuals at all stages of their career. Please note that unfortunately we cannot cover expenses for travel and accommodation. The conference fee (80€/50€) also applies to accepted speakers.

Conference Fee and Details:
Conference fee: 80€ (includes lunch and coffee breaks on both days; reduced fee for students: 50€)
Conference language: English
Conference website: www.ziwis.fau.de/public-research

Organizers:
Michael Jungert, Julia Böttcher, Jon Leefmann, Christoph Merdes, Sebastian Schuol
Center for Applied Philosophy of Science and Key Qualifications (ZiWiS)
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)

Submitted by Simon Lohse (University of Lübeck).

 

Die Universität zu Lübeck ist eine moderne Schwerpunktuniversität mit den Fächern Medizin und Gesundheitswissenschaften, Informatik, Molekularbiologie, Mathematik in Medizin und Lebenswissenschaften sowie medizinische Ingenieurwissenschaft. International renommierte Forschung und die hohe Qualität der akademischen Lehre kennzeichnen das Profil unserer Universität.

Am Institut für Medizingeschichte und Wissenschaftsforschung (IMGWF) ist ab dem 1. Mai 2021 eine Stelle als

Promovierte wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin /
Promovierter wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter (m/w/d)

in Teilzeit (75 %) befristet bis zum 31. Oktober 2022 zu besetzen. Die Option einer Verlängerung ist gegeben.

Tätigkeitschwerpunkte:
Mitarbeit im Projekt „Improving Interdisciplinary Knowledge Integration in Public Health Crisis Management“ (gefördert von der Volkswagen Stiftung), in dem am Beispiel der aktuellen COVID-19-Pandemie die Rolle der Sozialwissenschaften im politischen Umgang mit Bedrohungen der öffentlichen Gesundheit untersucht wird. Dabei wird ein besonderes Augenmerk auf Aspekte des epistemischen Pluralismus und das Zusammenspiel von biomedizinischer und sozialwissenschaftlicher Expertise im Pandemie-Management in Deutschland gelegt. Die erwarteten Ergebnisse dieses Projekts sind ein tieferes Verständnis institutioneller und epistemischer Herausforderungen für die interdisziplinäre Wissensintegration im Kontext der Politikberatung und strategische Ansatzpunkte zur Verbesserung des Status quo. Ihr Tätigkeitsschwerpunkt wäre die empirische Analyse des Zusammenspiels von Politik und Wissenschaft in 2020/21 anhand von Policy-Dokumenten, wissenschaftlichen Stellungsnahmen, Zeitzeugenberichten usw.

Anforderungsprofil
Sie haben ein für dieses Forschungsvorhaben einschlägiges Studium (z.B. Politikwissenschaft, Sozialwissenschaften, Geschichtswissenschaft oder Science & Technology Studies) erfolgreich mit einer Promotion abgeschlossen. Sie verfügen über theoretische Kenntnisse im Bereich der evidenzbasierten Politik oder der wissenschaftlichen Politikberatung. Idealerweise haben Sie Erfahrung in der empirischen Forschung an der Schnittstelle Wissenschaft/Politik. Als Mitglied im wissenschaftlichen Team können Sie an den oben skizzierten Forschungsbereich anknüpfen, sind mit der selbständigen Durchführung von komplexen Forschungsprojekten vertraut und kennen auch die Forschungspraxis in interdisziplinären Settings. Wünschenswert sind Erfahrungen in der wissenschaftsreflexiven Forschung und im Bereich qualitativer Methoden oder der Politikfeldanalyse.

Die Eingruppierung erfolgt nach Maßgabe der Tarifautomatik bei Erfüllung der tarifli­chen Voraussetzungen bis in die Entgeltgruppe E 13 TV-L. Eine endgültige Stellenbe­wertung bleibt vorbehalten.

Die Universität zu Lübeck versteht sich als moderne und weltoffene Arbeitgeberin. Wir begrüßen Ihre Bewerbung unabhängig Ihres Alters, Ihres Geschlechts, Ihrer kulturellen und sozialen Herkunft, Religion, Weltanschauung, Behinderung oder sexuellen Identi­tät. Wir fördern die Gleichberechtigung der Geschlechter. Frauen werden bei gleichwer­tiger Eignung, Befähigung und fachlicher Leistung vorrangig berücksichtigt. Als Bewer­berin oder Bewerber mit Schwerbehinderung oder ihnen gleichgestellte Person berück­sichtigen wir Sie bei entsprechender Eignung bevorzugt.

Für weitergehende Fragen zum Aufgabengebiet steht Ihnen Herr Dr. Simon Lohse (simon.lohse@uni-luebeck.de) gern zur Verfügung.

Schriftliche Bewerbungen mit den üblichen Unterlagen (u.a. ein max. 2-seitiges An­schreiben, einen Lebenslauf und relevante Zeugnisse/Zertifikate) und eine kurze Schrift­ probe (Englisch oder Deutsch) richten Sie bitte unter Angabe der Kennziffer 1006/21 bis spätestens zum 14.03.2021 (Eingangsdatum) in einem PDF-Dokument an bewer­bung@uni-luebeck.de. Bei der Schriftprobe kann es sich auch um einen Auszug eines noch nicht veröffentlichten Textes handeln.

Universität zu Lübeck – Die Präsidentin – Referat Personal Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23562 Lübeck

Submitted by Jan Baedke (Ruhr University Bochum).

 

Postgenomic Determinisms: Environmental Narratives after the Century of the Gene
(Online workshop, Ruhr University Bochum, March 25–26, 2021)

This online workshop focuses on new postgenomic trends towards environmental determinism. It aims to address the conceptual foundations and theoretical presumptions of different forms of strong causal influences on organisms and human bodies. In addition, it will historically contextualize this new environmentalist trend, and explore the anthropological, social and political contexts affecting and being affected by these developments.
This workshop will bring together scholars from history and philosophy of science, social sciences, biologists and activists who have expertise in postgenomic trends towards determinism from philosophical, anthropological, socio-political, and historical perspectives.

Participants:
Salim Al-Gailani (University of Cambridge), Tatjana Buklijas (University Auckland), Azita Chellappoo (Ruhr University Bochum), Joseph L. Graves Jr (North Carolina A&T State University), Beth Greenhough (University of Oxford), Martha Kenney (San Francisco State University), Tiana Dodson (Body Liberation Coach), Maurizio Meloni (Deakin University), Jamie Lorimer (University of Oxford), Jan Baedke (Ruhr University Bochum), Francesca Merlin (University of Paris), Ruth Müller (Technical University of Munich), Abigail Nieves-Delgado (Wageningen University), Javier Suárez (University of Bielefeld/Jagiellonian University in Krakow)

Call for posters:
There will be a virtual poster session during the workshop. We invite graduate students/early career scholars to submit abstracts for posters. Deadline for submission of abstracts: March 1st, 2021.

Registration:
Attendance at the workshop is free, although we require registration in advance. The talks and Q&As will be held on Zoom. The coffee breaks and poster session will be held on Gather Town.

For more information about the program, registration, and call for posters, please visit: https://rotoworkshop2021.wixsite.com/pgdeterminisms

Organization:
Azita Chellappoo
Jan Baedke
‘ROTO’ Research Group (The Return of the Organism in the Biosciences),
Ruhr University Bochum

Submitted by Stephan Hartmann (MCMP, LMU Munich)

 

*********************************************
Postdoctoral Position at the MCMP (Project “The Bayesian Approach to Robust Argumentation Machines”)
LMU Munich
https://www.mcmp.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/news/post_doc_rob_arg_2021/index.html
*********************************************

The Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy (MCMP) and the Chair of Philosophy of Science at the Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and Study of Religion at LMU Munich seek applications for a 3-year postdoctoral position.

The successful candidate has a background in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, mathematical social science, mathematical philosophy or statistics with an expertise in machine learning and big data and will work on the project “The Bayesian Approach to Robust Argumentation Machines”. The project is funded by the German Research Council (DFG) within the interdisciplinary priority program “Robust Argumentation Machines” and conducted together with the group of Prof. Ulrike Hahn at Birkbeck College.

For more information and details see: https://www.mcmp.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/news/post_doc_rob_arg_2021/index.html

Submitted by Jürgen Landes (MCMP, LMU Munich).

*********************************************

The Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy invites extended abstracts for the following event: 

Progic 2021: Combining Probability and Logic

MCMP, LMU Munich

September 1-3, 2021

https://www.fatil.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/events/defence_inductive_logic/index.html
*********************************************

The 10th event in the Progic series of conferences is set to take place 1. Sep – 3. Sep 2021. This series has a long-standing interest in combining probability and logic.


The conference is preceded by a one day Summer School on 31. Aug 2021, where introductory lectures on the themes of the conference will be given by invited speakers.

Call for applications

Submissions are invited on topics that combine probability and logic such as:

  • Argumentation
  • Belief revision
  • Causal modelling
  • Decision making
  • Desirability
  • Game theory
  • Epistemic utility
  • Foundations – decision making & machine learning & mathematical & philosophical & statistical
  • Machine learning
  • Preference
  • Uncertain inference
  • History of these topics with a clear relevance for ongoing work

Progic 2021 is particularly interested in inductive logic and entropy with respect to foundations, applications and theory.

Submissions consist of an extended abstract (ca. 1000 words, pdf format) uploaded at easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=progic2021. The submissions page will also ask for a short abstract and keywords to sort submissions for review. Please, use the short abstract field to indicate whether you are interested in submitting a paper to a special issue with the Annals of Pure and Applied Logic that is edited in conjunction with Progic 2021. Submissions to Progic 2021 must be prepared for anonymous review.

Dates and Deadines

Submission Deadline: 31.03.2021

Notifications of Acceptance: 01.05.2021

Organizers 

Jürgen Landes (LMU Munich)

Submitted by Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin)

 

Call for Abstracts

2nd European Society for the History of Science Early Career Scholars Conference

20-22 September 2021 in Athens, Greece

We invite submissions for individual papers addressing the main topic of the conference:

Science and its Enemies: Exploring Conflicts and Alliances in the History of Science.

The terminology of “enemy” connotes “opponent”, “antagonist”, “adversary”, “rival”, or “competitor”, and thereby opens perspectives in various directions. This topic thus comprises a wide range of potential ‘enemies’ of science, including material, natural, supernatural, and ideological ones, and perhaps even science itself.

Note that the main topic is meant as a guideline and does not serve as an exclusionary factor for the selection of papers. Any topic on the History of Science is welcome. Submissions by individuals from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to submit an abstract.

For more details, please visit our website:

https://eshsathens2021.wordpress.com/

The Early Career Scholars Network of the European Society for the History of Science (ESHS) was founded to better integrate graduate students and early career researchers in the activities of the Society and in the field of History of Science. The first Early Career Scholars Conference was held in 2019 in Paris, and it continues to be organized biennially in different cities around the world. The second conference in the series is planned to be held on 20-22 September 2021 in Athens, Greece. Depending on the development of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, however, this plan might be subject to change.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Theodore Arabatzis (Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Athens, ESHS President Elect)
Kostas Gavroglu (Emeritus Professor of History of Science, University of Athens)

Host institutions:
The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
The National Hellenic Research Foundation

Conference Organizing Committee: Beatriz Martínez-Rius (Sorbonne Université Paris), Jelena Stanulovic (University of Belgrade), Grigoris Panoutsopoulos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens), Cosmin Koszor-Codrea (Brooks University, Oxford), and Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt University Berlin)

Submissions: PhD candidates and Early Career Scholars (up to eight years after they obtained their PhD) in History of Science or related disciplines are invited to submit a proposal.

Individual proposals must include an abstract up to 300 words, for a 20-minute presentation, and name and affiliation of the candidate. Please submit all proposals via e-mail: eshs.athens.2021@gmail.com

Deadline for submissions: March 14th, 2021

Notification of acceptance: April 25th, 2021

Travel bursaries: The ESHS offers a limited number of small travel funds for speakers who need financial aid. Applicants are asked to send, besides their abstract, a motivation letter (maximum one page) and a short CV.

For more information, you may contact us via Facebook, Twitter (@EshsC), or e-mail [eshs.athens.2021@gmail.com]

Call for Registrations

SPRING SCHOOL and WORKSHOP on Laws and Explanations in Metaphysics and Science

DFG-funded research group Inductive Metaphysics and Department of Philosophy, University of Duesseldorf

http://dclps.phil.hhu.de/lems/

DATE & ACCESS:
March 24-25, 2021 (the spring school introductory course takes place on March 24; on March 25 there will be a workshop on the same topics). This is an online-event (Zoom). Further instructions and access information will be sent to registered participants in due course.

SPEAKERS:
* Anna-Sofia Maurin (University of Gothenburg)
* Kristie Miller (University of Sydney)
* Jonathan Schaffer (Rutgers University)
* Naomi Thompson (University of Southampton)

AIMS & SCOPE:
In recent metaphysics, there has been a great interest in the metaphysical notion of grounding, which links metaphysics and explanation in a novel way. Grounding is claimed to be the common element in various “in-virtue-of” claims such as “I am in pain in virtue of certain activation-patterns of my nervous system (c-fibre firing).”
In philosophy of science, scientific, i.e., causal and nomological explanation has long been the focus of reflection.
This spring school focusses on the relation between metaphysical grounding on the one hand and scientific explanation on the other.
In particular, we want to ask questions such as what the characteristic features of these two notions of explanation are, whether grounding explanations in metaphysics can play an analogous role to causal or nomological explanations in the sciences, and whether metaphysical grounding and scientific explanations can be treated in a unified framework.

SPRING SCHOOL INTRODUCTORY COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
The main target audience of the spring school introductory course are MA and PhD students in philosophy, however, this is not an exclusive criterion, for which reason the spring school introductory course is also open for BA students and PostDocs.

COSTS:
Attending the spring school introductory course and workshop is free of charge.

REGISTRATION & ORGANISATION:
* Please register via the online registration form at our website: <http://dclps.phil.hhu.de/lems/>.
* The deadline for registrations is March 15, 2021.
* Organisation: Markus Schrenk, Siegfried Jaag, Maria Sekatskaya, Christian J. Feldbacher-Escamilla
* If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us via <christian.feldbacher-escamilla@hhu.de>.
* The spring school and workshop is generously supported by the University of Duesseldorf and the DFG-funded research group Inductive Metaphysics.

Submitted by Inken Rabbel (Hochschulrektorenkonferenz).

Digitale Themenwoche zu den Kleinen Fächern

Vom 8. bis zum 11. März 2021 bietet die Hochschulrektorenkonferenz gemeinsam mit dem Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung eine digitale Themenwoche zu den Kleinen Fächern an. Die Veranstaltung ist Teil der Initiative „Kleine Fächer-Wochen an deutschen Hochschulen“ und hat zum Ziel, die Perspektiven der Kleinen Fächer in der deutschen und europäischen Wissenschaftslandschaft zu beleuchten und zu diskutieren.

Eine zentrale Herausforderung für die Kleinen Fächer ist ihre Sichtbarkeit – sowohl hochschulintern als auch innerhalb der Wissenschaftslandschaft und der allgemeinen Öffentlichkeit. Wie können sich Kleine Fächer ins Gespräch bringen?  Dieser Frage wird Prof. Dr. Carsten Könneker, Geschäftsführer der Klaus Tschira Stiftung, in seinem Keynote-Beitrag im Rahmen der Eröffnungsveranstaltung am 8. März 2021, 17-19 Uhr,  nachgehen. Vom 9. bis zum 11. März 2021 bieten drei separate Thementage zu den Themenfeldern „Wissenschaftskommunikation“, „Studiengangsentwicklung“ und „Nachwuchsförderung“ vielfältige Gelegenheiten zum Austausch.

Wir würden uns freuen, Sie bei unserer digitalen Themenwoche im März begrüßen zu dürfen. Informationen zum detaillierten Programmablauf mit Vorträgen, Workshops, Interviews und Podiumsdiskussionen sowie Informationen zur Anmeldung werden im Februar an dieser Stelle bekannt gegeben.

Submitted by Corina Strößner (Ruhr University Bochum).

Call for papers: Protolang 7 (HHU Düsseldorf, September 6-8, 2021)

The 7th International Conference “Ways to Protolanguage” is going to take place at the University of Düsseldorf from Sept 6 to Sept 8, 2021. The thematic focus of Protolang is on delineating the socio-cultural, semiotic, symbolic, ecological genetic, anatomical and neuro-cognitive requirements for evolving (proto)language. Sign use, tools, cooperative breeding, pointing, vocalisation, intersubjectivity, bodily mimesis, planning and navigation are among many examples of such possible factors through which hominins have gained a degree of specificity that is not found in other forms of animal communication and cognition. We aim at identifying the proximate and ultimate causes as well as the mechanisms by which these requirements evolved; evaluating the methodologies, research tools and simulation techniques; and enabling extended and vigorous exchange of ideas across disciplinary borders.

Keynote speakers of Protolang 7 and their main research areas:

  • Michel DeGraff (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Linguistic theory, creole studies, language and education
  • Katja Liebal (Leipzig University)
    Human biology and primate cognition
  • Asifa Majid (University of York)
    Psychology of language and communication
  • Albert Newen (Ruhr University Bochum)
    Philosophy of mind
  • Cailin O’Connor (University of California Irvine)
    Philophy of science and evolutionary game theory
  • Asli Ozyurek (Max-Planck-Institute for Psycholinguistics Nijmegen)
    Multimodal language processing

We invite scholars from linguistics, behavioral science, cognitive science and related disciplines to contribute experimental and theoretical research. Please submit abstracts of up to 500 words, excl. references, via easychair (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=protolang7).

  • Deadline for submission: February 15th 2021
  • Notification: March 2021

Note on Covid-19:
We are very much aware that it is currently far from clear whether Protolang 7 can take place as a physical conference. We still plan for an on-site conference with an option to participate online, but are prepared to make it a fully virtual conference if necessary.

Submitted by Adrian Wüthrich (TU Berlin).

2nd Call for Papers

We extend the deadline for submissions to the workshop announced below until 15 January 2021. For this second call, we particularly encourage contributions dealing with the life sciences, or with periods before the 20th century.

Virtual entities in science: a virtual workshop

5, 12 and 19 March 2021, online 

Organized by the Project Virtual Particles” (A1) of the Research Unit The Epistemology of the Large Hadron Collider”

Not only since the sudden increase of online communication due to the COVID-19 situation has the concept of the “virtual” made its way into everyday language. In this context, it mostly denotes a digital substitute of a real object or process. “Virtual reality” is perhaps the best known term in this respect. 

With these digital connotations, “virtuality” has been used also in science and research: Chemists use virtual laboratories, biologists do virtual scanning of molecular structures, and geologists engage in virtual field trips. 

But the concept of the “virtual” has a much longer tradition, dating back to long before the dawn of the digital age. Virtual displacements and virtual images were introduced in classical physics already in the 18th century. They represented auxiliary objects or processes without instantiation, with the purpose of efficiently describing specific physical systems. Through Heisenberg’s use of “potentia” in his late attempts to interpret quantum mechanics, the term “virtual” may even relate back to Aristotle.

In today’s physics, the term virtual is mostly associated with the quantum world, first and foremost with the “virtual particle” of quantum field theory. It has become such an integral part of modern high energy physics that its ontological character may be considered to go beyond the purely auxiliary, which is typically associated with the virtual. The various possibilities for a virtual particle to manifest itself in a measurement highlights, furthermore, how “potentiality” continues to be a characteristic feature of virtual entities. 

In other disciplines, however, use of the term “virtual” without a digital connotation is much rarer. While concepts like “virtual adrenaline” in medicine and biochemistry arise in the 1940s, and the “virtual moon” figures quite prominently in some (English translations of) Babylonian calendar texts, these examples seem to be rather singular occurrences of entities that were explicitly called “virtual”. The basic idea behind the terminology of the virtual, however, could be much more common, even outside of physics. The “invisible hand” in economics, or the “vital force” in biology, for instance, do carry aspects of a virtual entity, even if they have not been called that way. 

For this workshop we invite contributions that address the historical formation and philosophical interpretation of concepts of virtual entities in physics and other disciplines – in whatever terms they may come. The main goal of the workshop is to bring to the fore similarities and differences in the meanings and functions of these concepts so as to be able to precisely characterize why certain entities are considered virtual in specific contexts, why a different terminology was often used in each individual case and in what sense the virtual entities relate to the real world. 

We are looking for contributions that address the role of these concepts in theoretical as well as experimental activities, and for investigations into the origins of the terminology of the virtual as it was applied to the various disciplines of natural science. Work that integrates philosophical and historical approaches is particularly welcome. 

Among other things, contributions may focus on one of the following aspects which are usually associated with virtual entities, in particular if we think of the virtual particle of modern quantum field theory:

·    The terminology of virtuality, including its etymology, and why it was applied to the entities in question: Why not other terms like “substitute” or “auxiliary”? 

·    The potentiality inherent in virtual entities to bring about certain effects, which may eventually be realized or not: How is this to be understood exactly? 

·    The ontology of virtual entities: How is it different from real entities, and how do we get epistemic access to virtual entities? 

The workshop will be held online. Apart from the contributed talks, the program will feature a small number of keynotes. To contribute a paper, please send a title and an abstract (approx. 200 words) along with your name, affiliation and contact details to adrian.wuethrich@tu-berlin.de no later than 15 January 2021 (extended deadline). 

For further information and updates please consult the conference webpage or contact one of the organizers. 

Robert Harlander, Jean-Philippe Martinez, Friedrich Steinle, Adrian Wüthrich (adrian.wuethrich@tu-berlin.de)

Submitted by Niels Martens (University of Bonn).

The Heinrich Hertz Fellowship in History and Philosophy of physics is designed to allow graduate students (typically PhD students but Master students can also apply) and early-career postdoctoral scholars to spend either half of or a full academic year at the University of Bonn to work on any topic in the history and philosophy of physics. They have no formal duties apart from following their own research agenda and interacting with the other historians and philosophers of physics in Bonn [ https://www.history-and-philosophy-of-physics.com/ ]. Hertz fellows are provided with:

  • A (possibly shared) office in the Institute of Philosophy of the University of Bonn. 
  • Reimbursement of all travel and visa costs to come to Bonn. 
  • A monthly stipend of 2500 Euros to cover accommodation and maintenance during the stay in Bonn. Stipends are not generally taxable in Germany. Fellows have to show that they have sufficient (travel) health insurance for their stay in Bonn. 
  • Reimbursements of some conference travel and similar expenses during the stay in Bonn.

Fellows can apply to spend either the winter semester, the summer semester or both (i.e. the whole academic year including the time between the two semesters) in Bonn. In the academic year of 2021/2022, the winter semester goes from early October to the end of January (with a two week break for the holidays) while the summer semester lasts from early April till the end of July.  

If you are interested in a Hertz fellowship, please send your complete application documents by 31 January 2021 to Ms Yvonne Luks at office.lehmkuhl@uni-bonn.de. Before sending your application, please combine and convert all of your documents into one PDF file. A complete application will consist of a.) a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a writing sample of no more than 10.000 words; and b.) up to three letters of reference which must be sent by the letter writers or the placement service directly to the above address. In your cover letter, please state for which semester(s) you would like to come to Bonn, what kind of research project you intend to pursue during your time here, and why pursuing this project in Bonn would be particularly useful to you. If you have questions, please contact Prof. Lehmkuhl (dennis.lehmkuhl@uni-bonn.de)

The University of Bonn is committed to diversity and equal opportunity. It is certified as a family-friendly university. It aims to increase the proportion of women in areas where women are under-represented and to promote their careers in particular. It therefore urges women with relevant qualifications to apply. Applications will be handled in accordance with the `Landesgleichstellungsgesetz’ (State Equality Act). Applications from suitable individuals with a certified serious disability and those of equal status are particularly welcome.

Special Issue on Bayesian Epistemology: Deadline 15.Jan.2021

Bayesian epistemology remains the dominant account of rational beliefs, it underpins the dominant account of decision making in science and beyond, as well as many of our statistical methods. While important applications continue to to emerge, the work on the foundations of Bayesian epistemology never stops and a number of challenges are emerging.

The aim of this special issue is bring together scholars exploring applications, challenges and foundations of Bayesian epistemology.
The special issue will appear in the open-access journal Kriterion.

Topics of interest (in alphabetic order) are not limited to:

    Accuracy
    Bayesianism and Artificial Intelligence
    Bayesian Networks
    Bounded Rationality
    Causation
    Confirmation
    Disagreement
    Evidence
    Evidence Aggregation
    Expansion
    Foundational Aspects of Bayesian Statistics
    Higher Order Evidence
    Imprecise Bayesian Approaches
    Induction
    Inference
    Interpretations of Probabilities
    Judgement Aggregation
    Maximum Entropy (Applications, Inference and Methods)
    Multi Agent Epistemology
    Objective Bayesian Epistemology
    Principles of Bayesianism (Conditionalisation, Probabilism, Total Evidence)
    Replication
    Updating Procedures (Jeffrey, KL, L&P).

Deadline for submissions: 15.Jan.2021.
Submissions of a manuscript (pdf only) prepared for double-blind peer review are to be sent to the guest editor:
juergen_landes@yahoo.de

This special issue appears in conjunction with a conference dedicated to Bayesian epistemology.

This special issue and the conference are organised by
Juergen Landes (LMU Munich)

Submitted by Karim Baraghith (DCLPS, University of Duesseldorf).

 

The DCLPS is organising a one-day Zoom-workshop on

THINKING ABOUT THE CULTURAL EVOLUTION OF THINKING

Date & Venue: January 22, 2021, Zoom
Website: http://dclps.phil.hhu.de/tacet/

 

Invited Speakers:

  • Azita Chellappoo (Bochum)
  • Cecilia Heyes (Oxford)
  • Larissa Mendoza Straffon (Bergen)
  • Samir Okasha (Bristol)
  • Mason Youngblood (New York)

 

Abstract:
Over the past decades, theories of cultural evolution gained more and more attention in the special sciences and in philosophy of science. Of particular interest is the mutual interaction and connection between culture and cognition. Culture has a huge impact on how (and what) we think and core aspects of thinking (such as memory, causal understanding, a theory of mind, rationality and other ‘cognitive gadgets’) are responsible for the products of cultural evolution.

Both share a Darwinian explanatory framework at their core, involving variation, selection, and reproduction/transmission. However, biological and cultural evolution differ in many important aspects and precise mechanisms – and many of these differences originate in the fact that we face ‘thinkers’ and more or less rational agents in cultural evolution. For example, cultural selection is subject to a whole range of ‘biases’ that have no analogue in biological evolution and are mostly grounded in cognitive capacities of the cultural agents.

While it is the aim of the special sciences to empirically explore this vast field of possible links between culture and thinking, social learning and cognition, it is the aim of philosophy of science to conceptually structure and represent this growing body of research. This workshop aims at bringing together scholars of both fields to inspire dialogue and future collaborations.

 

Call for registration:
To register, please contact one of the organisers before January 22, 2021.

 

Organisation & Contact:
Karim Baraghith karim.baraghith@hhu.de and Christian J. Feldbacher-Escamilla christian.feldbacher-escamilla@hhu.de
Duesseldorf Center for Logic and Philosophy of Science, DCLPS, University of Duesseldorf
Inductive Metaphysics: a DFG funded research group, the goal of which is to establish how empirical sources and inductive forms of inference play a role in metaphysical research

 

Important links:
Workshop website: http://dclps.phil.hhu.de/tacet/
DCLPS: https://dclps.phil.hhu.de
Inductive metaphysics: https://indmet.weebly.com/

Submitted by Benedikt Loewe (Universities of Amsterdam, Hamburg, and Cambridge).

 

World Logic Day 2021

14 January 2021

http://wld.cipsh.international/

Twitter: @UNESCO_WLD
Facebook: @WorldLogicDay

UNESCO proclaimed 14 January to be World Logic Day, a global day of
supporting the development of logic through teaching and research, as well
as to public dissemination of the discipline. The Conseil International de
Philosophie et des Sciences Humaines (CIPSH) and its member organisation,
the Division for Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science and
Technology of the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science
and Technology (DLMPST/IUHPST), are coordinating the dynamic and global
annual celebration of World Logic Day aiming at fostering international
cooperation, promoting the development of logic, in both research and
teaching, supporting the activities of associations, universities and
other institutions involved with logic, and enhancing public understanding
of logic and its implications for science, technology and innovation.

We invite everyone in the world interested in logic to organise events
celebrating World Logic Day 2021 on 14 January 2021 (or on convenient date
close to the 14th of January). WLD events

  • can be academic or non-academic,
  • can be aimed at the general public or specialists,
  • can focus on any of the many facets of logic from disciplines such as
    mathematics, philosophy, computer science, linguistics, or others, and
  • can use any format, e.g., it could be a lecture, a workshop, a panel
    discussion, an information bazaar, etc. etc.

Please be aware that in the current global pandemic, almost all events
will be virtual. This is a huge opportunity since it will allow people
from outside of your local community to participate without any travel
expenses. However, it also means that all WLD events will be in
competition with each other for the attention of the global logic
community, especially if they all take place at the same time. Be aware of
this issue as you organise your WLD event and decide on the time schedule.
As mentioned, the event does not have to be on 14 January 2021, but can be
on a date close to that day.

If you are organising an event and wish to be listed in the official list
of WLD 2021 events on our website and use the official WLD logo in your
announcements, please follow the simple and informal instructions below to
obtain the status of an official WLD 2021 event.

Instructions:

(1) Create a website for the event or a draft flyer (in pdf format) that
describes the event. The website/flyer must contain the following
information:

  • What is going to happen? (Format, speakers, etc.)
  • When is it going to happen? (Date and time.)
  • Who is organising it? (Name of the main organiser and contact
    information.)
  • In which format is it going to happen? (If in a physical location,
    give location information; if online, say how participants may obtain the
    login information.)

(2) Send an e-mail to wld (at) cipsh (dot) international with the link to
the website and/or with the draft flyer as a pdf attachment and a formal
request to be added to the list of UNESCO WLD events. We expect to decide
on each request within five working days. If you have not received a
message within a week, feel free to send a reminder.

(3) If your event fits with the principles of UNESCO World Logic Day, it
will be added to the official list on our website and you will get the
official WLD graphics to use on your website and in your flyer. (You can
send us an updated flyer for the list on our website once you have
incorporated the graphics.)

After the event, please send a brief report (at most one page, in pdf
format) to wld (at) cipsh (dot) international that will be published on
the website.

Submitted by Jürgen Landes (MCMP, LMU Munich).

 

*********************************************
The Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy invites abstracts for the following event:

Philosophy and Methodology of Medicine

Online at the MCMP, LMU Munich
June 1-3, 2021
https://www.mcmp.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/events/workshops/container/methodology_medicine_2021/index.html
*********************************************

The claims of medicine have been supported by a wide variety of different methods, ranging from randomized controlled trials to expert judgement and mechanism-based reasoning. Miriam Solomon has therefore aptly characterized medicine in terms of a developing, untidy, methodological pluralism. But can philosophers help with this development? In recent years, philosophers of science have become increasingly interested in assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods employed in medicine. Some have defended the methodological superiority of randomized controlled trials, or at least meta-analyses of such trials. Others have challenged this superiority by on the one hand stressing the weaknesses of such methods in terms of their internal or external validity, and on the other hand emphasising the strengths of alternative methods, including methods involving expert judgement and mechanistic evidence.

This online conference will bring together philosophers of science and medical methodologists in an attempt to make progress towards resolving these debates concerning the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods employed in medicine.

We welcome submissions of abstracts of no longer than one page (not including references) for thirty-minute talks on topics in the philosophy and methodology of medicine, including but not limited to:

  • Causal inference in medicine
  • Foundational issues in statistics in medicine
  • Bias in medical inference
  • Medical epistemology
  • Multi-agent medical epistemology
  • Mechanisms in medicine
  • Analogy and extrapolation in medicine
  • Expert judgement in medicine.

The conference will be preceded by a Summer School to introduce graduate students and others to the main themes in the debates.

Call for abstracts

Upload an abstract (pdf) at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=phiandmethofmed21.

Length of abstract: Up to 1 page of text, references can go on Page 2.

Deadline: 03.03.2021.

The Easychair submission form also asks you to fill a field called ”abstract”. Just type ”N/A” or similar.

Expected notifications: End of March 2021

Organizers
Jürgen Landes (MCMP)
Michael Wilde (Kent)

Submitted by Paul Hasselkuß (Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf).

31st Novembertagung on the History and Philosophy of Mathematics “AXIOMATICS: ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES”


November 26th–28th 2020, 9:30 – 18:00 CET / UTC+1Online, hosted by Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany


The Novembertagung is an international graduate conference on the History and Philosophy of Mathematics and neighbouring fields. It aims to provide an opportunity for graduate students at all levels to present and discuss their research in an informal and safe environment. It also allows early career researchers to share experiences, get advice, and establish new contacts.

Keynote talks:

  • Tinne Hoff Kjeldsen (Copenhagen): TBA
  • Juliette Kennedy (Helsinki): “The Foundational Project. Where Do We Stand?”
  • Dirk Schlimm (McGill): “Axioms in Mathematical Practice”

The full programme can be found on our website: https://wp.me/P3q6kn-dU. To participate, please register here: https://wp.me/P3q6kn-dO. Please note: to maintain the usual community-feeling and to allow networking, we hope that you participate in most of the conference.


On the theme: While Euclid (c. 3rd century BC) is usually celebrated as the beginning of axiomatic science, many features that are nowadays taken to be essential to axiomatics––such as the explicit statement of inference rules and the requirement of primitive, undefined notions––appear to be alien to ancient mathematics. A major contemporary change in the view on axiomatics was initiated by the adoption of the set-theoretic axiomatic framework as a foundation of mathematics in the first half of the 20th century. Proof theory and model theory subsequently developed as independent research fields and had a wide impact on philosophical thought. On the other hand, some philosophers also argue that the axiomatic view on mathematics may be harmful in that it omits fundamental aspects of mathematical practice and idealizes mathematical reasoning in an unfaithful way.

Organization: Paul Hasselkuß (Universität Düsseldorf), Tiago Hirth (ULisboa), Deborah Kant (Universität Konstanz), Deniz Sarikaya (Universität Hamburg), Tobias Schütz (Universität Mainz), Anna Kiel Steensen (ETH Zürich), and Benjamin Wilck (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin).

Support: This event is hosted by the Research Training Group Philosophy, Science and the Sciences at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and generously supported by the British Society for the History of Mathematics (BSHM), International Commission on the History of Mathematics (ICHM), GDR 3398 “Histoire des mathématiques”, the German Society for Philosophy of Science (GWP), the Ludus association and the Schimank – Foundation.


Contact: For any query, do not hesitate to send us an e-mail at novembertagung2020 [at] gmail [dot] com. Further info can be found on our website: https://novembertagung.wordpress.com.